Missouri Native Plant Society Annual Awards


Award nominations due May 15

The MONPS Awards Committee seeks nominations of people who have supported the preservation of Missouri’s flora. MONPS offers five awards:

  • Erna Eisendrath Memorial Education Award, recognizing individuals who, through teaching, writing, or other activity have conveyed to others a significant appreciation and knowledge of Missouri’s native flora.
  • Arthur Christ Research Award, recognizing an individual’s significant contribution in furthering the knowledge of Missouri flora.
  • Plant Stewardship Award, recognizing an individual or organization for the preservation of important elements of Missouri’s flora through purchase, registry, and/or management practice.
  • The John E. Wylie Award, recognizing individuals who have provided exceptional service to the Society.
  • Plant Conservation Award, recognizing an individual or organization for outstanding contributions to the conservation or preservation of native plants or plant communities in Missouri. This award differs from the Plant Stewardship Award in that it is not tied to direct acquisition or management of tracts of land, but instead may recognize various types of outstanding achievements or efforts, such as conservation planning, advocacy, or new ways of looking at old problems.
  • Julian A. Steyermark Award, the Society’s highest award, given to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to any and all aspects of Missouri botany.

The deadline for nominations is June 1. Nominations should contain the full name of the nominee and the name of the person making the nomination, and they should set forth the contributions of the individual or organization that merits recognition. Award recipients need not be members of MONPS.

Please submit nominations to Awards Committee Chairwoman, Michelle Bowe.

Michelle Bowe
Department of Biology
Missouri State University
901 S. National Ave.
Springfield, MO 65897

mbowe@missouristate.edu

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: ATTEND THE 2020 MONPS FIELD TRIPS!

Dates and general locations for the 2020 field trips are finalized below and we’d love to see you there! Bring your family and friends. Please note that the specific field sites for each trip will definitely change and narrow as planning progresses. The field sites shown below are those that were suggested as possibilities during the 2019 winter board meeting and are presented here to whet your appetite for types of sites in the regions.

Field trips generally consist of a Friday afternoon excursion, a full-day field trip on Saturday to one or more locales, and a Sunday morning field trip. Attendees are welcome to join the expedition for all three days, or to just come for the portion/s that fit your schedule. An invited speaker will provide a presentation during one evening (usually Friday) and we will hold a board meeting one evening as well.

For detailed logistics about each trip, keep an eye on upcoming issues of the Petal Pusher, the MONPS Website and our Facebook page.

Schedule of upcoming Field Trips & Meetings

Spring – May 1-3 – Bolivar, MO – Bona Glade, Corry Flatrocks, Rocky Barrens, 25 Mile Prairie

Summer – June 12-14 – Kansas City (joint w/Kansas Native Plant Society) – Snowball Hill, Fishkill Prairie, Jerry Smith Prairie, Anderson Prairie (KS)

Fall – Sept 25-27 – Alley Spring, Blue Springs, Pine Woodlands – Speaker: Neal Humke?

Winter – MDC Office, Columbia

Do you want some easy and fun facts about native plants?

Of course you do! Check out the fact sheets we have about native plants and other topics. Here you’ll find information about Missouri ecotypes, native plants, gardening, landscaping, and how to avoid the nasty non-natives. If you have an idea for a fact sheet you’d like to see added, let us know!

If you just can’t get enough here, try the Wild Ones for even more information:

  • Landscaping with Native Plants
  • Monarch Matters
  • Publications

Bringing Nature Home

Bringing Nature Home

Are you looking for a gift for that person in your life who is on the cusp of becoming a native plant enthusiast? There is no doubt that it’s difficult to convince people to plant natives so insects can eat them! Isn’t that what we’re trying to avoid, they’ll say? Look no further than Doug Tallamy’s Bringing Nature Home. In particular, Tallamy makes the case that the birds that so many people enjoy absolutely depend on native plants to raise the insects and spiders needed to raise their young. It’s an easy and compelling read and has convinced me to put as much of our farm as possible in natives of some kind.